by Norman Descendants August 15, 2017

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Are you aware of the origins of Fitz? Fits is pronounced as “fits” it was a prefix used in surnames of Norman origin of the 11th century.

The word is a Norman French noun meaning “son of”, from Latin Filius (son), plus a genitive case of the father’s forename. Whilst Fitz is now the standard form used by modern historians the word appears in ancient documents with various spellings such as fiz, filz, etc. The word has developed in modern French to fils de, with which it is related.

The Normans were descended from Norsemen or Vikings and the usage appears to reflect the Scandinavian tradition of adding ‘son’ after the father’s name in most cases. There are, however, exceptions in which the name of a more noteworthy mother Fitz Wymarch or a parent’s title Fitz Count, Fitz Empress was used instead. Such surnames were later created for illegitimate children of royal princes.

Parent’s title (Fitz Count, Fitz Empress) was used instead. Such surnames were later created for illegitimate children of royal princes.

Norman Descendants
Norman Descendants

Normans were the people who gave their name to Normandy, a region in northern France. They were descended from Viking conquerors lead by Rollo of the territory and the native Merovingian culture formed from Germanic Franks and Romanised Gauls. Their identity emerged initially in the first half of the 10th century, and gradually evolved over succeeding centuries.